Sprinter Sha’Carri Richardson is now America’s fastest woman


sha'carri richardson

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In just 10.64 seconds, Sha’Carri Richardson has become a household name.

The 21-year-old sprinter stunned the world this weekend after winning her 100-meter race and securing a coveted spot on the U.S. women’s team for the Tokyo Olympics next month. After his trial dominance and in a post-competition interview, Richardson revealed his victory followed a heartbreaking week; the athlete shared that his birth mother passed away just a week before her Olympic certification victory.

“My family kept me down to earth,” Richardson told NBC, according to ESPN after his sprint. “This year has been crazy for me. Since last week, the loss of my birth mother, and I’m still here. … Last week, I learned that my biological mother had passed away and I always chose to follow my dreams, to always come here, always there to make proud the family that I still have on this earth. … I am very grateful to them. Without them there would be no me. Without my grandmother, there would be no Sha’Carri Richardson. My family is my everything, my everything until the day I’m done.

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Twitter was quick to praise Richardson not only for his athletic skills, but also for his emotional courage in being able to compete just days after his mother died. Others said they admired Richardson’s unique and unashamed style as she raced to victory with her bright orange hair, acrylic nails, tattoos and piercings.

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This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

If Richardson wins gold in Tokyo next month, she will be the first American woman to do so since Gail Devers in 1996.

In other post-race interview with NBC, when asked what she wanted viewers at home to know about herself, Richardson replied, “I just want the world to know that I am. this girl … and every time i get on the track i will try to do what me, my coach, my support team believe i can do and talent god blessed me. … I will never take an opportunity to play in vain.

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