Travis Scott x Dior: how big should fashion be?

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Another big question: does a designer have to either be a celebrity, like Marc Jacobs, Rick Owens or Abloh, or use a celebrity? I also noticed that Bottega Veneta is dressing more rappers – Migos at this weekend’s BET Awards, for example, and they put Scott on the cover of their most recent zine. Fashion’s relationship with celebrity isn’t inherently problematic: it mostly looks good that Jay Z wears and invests in Rhude, and Harry Styles wears Bode, and Travis Scott buys those A-Cold-Wall war vests. But is there a way to stage a successful fashion moment without forcing those kinds of connections?

In fact, the designers who are thriving right now are the ones who think small and personal, and who are fundamentally rewriting the role of the fashion designer. Hedonism has always been part of Jonathan Anderson’s Loewe DNA – he’s a cute guy who grew up partying in Ibiza, after all – but it was the pursuit of fun in its purest form. The potent pink of his wispy knits and little space boots practically screamed at you to put them on, especially under the picture of David Sims, who threw a boxing mechanic sneaking out of a circus tent and a hunky dude in some big shorts and tubular socks and others impressively. strange faces that blurred the line between sideshow monsters and skatepark installations. Like JW, it was knotty, but more dad.

Anderson, like other designers who also feature women’s clothing, suggested he would likely return to the catwalks in September, although he said he was already feeling anxious about the backstage melee. . And why wouldn’t he? He’s no longer just a designer, but also an image director, bookmaker and world builder, creating the clothes he wants to see in a David Sims photograph. This new multimedia has become a crucial and probably permanent way for brands to talk to their customers. Fashion designers are now creative directors, magazine editors, priests, style guides and life coaches.

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Some designers believe the change is less about clothing and more about their audience. Thom Browne got even more ambitious with his video collection this time around, pulling off a 30-minute mini-epic about a long-distance runner from the American West. It was less about actual clothing – he’s showing men with his women in a live show in New York this fall – than the “mood” of the brand, as he put it.

Matthew Williams, who submitted a truly stunning video for an unusually Californian 1017 Alyx 9SM collection, told me the biggest change he’s seen this year is in the appetite for video. “We’ve always made films for Alyx,” he said, but “the industry, buyers and customers are a lot more open to seeing fashion film as a medium. They really are. watching these videos. I have noticed that when I go to, say, Dover Street, groups of young people in their twenties move from section to section like pilgrims on some kind of religious journey, checking out the different collections and kneeling down. . They aren’t even here to buy anything – the knowledge, and now all of that books, videos, and content, are just as much a product as the clothes themselves. “” People take the time to kiss and look and really look and smell, “as Williams said.

Courtesy of Lemaire.
Courtesy of Lemaire.
Courtesy of Lemaire.

So with all of that in mind, seeing something that just grooves is a relief to the eyes and the mind. No crisis here, we know exactly what we are doing. Lemaire and Hermès are brands that always stick to their guns. You may be blamed if you are an act of novelty, but if you are a designer like Christopher Lemaire and Sarah-Linh Tran, or Véronique Nichanian d’Hermès, consistency is a sign of integrity. When every brand tries to reinvent itself, to go back to another era or to be sent by Cactus Jack, there is an extremely satisfying serenity in clothes, like those of Lemaire, designed for the sophisticated and like those of Hermès, who makes objects to live well. Lemaire in particular lacked a certain crunch this season, but in a very good way – it’s the plain cottons and khakis that a brand like Banana Republic is trying to solidify with just a few drops of fashion. Not too much. And Hermès, one of the only brands in the world with a sense of humor, showed it a bit with some really cool big shorts and tie-dye sweaters. It was perfectly without hype.

Courtesy of Hermès.
Courtesy of Hermès.
Courtesy of Hermès.

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